Movie Review: Disney Pixar’s Inside Out

“In today’s society, Inside Out has provided an important moral lesson to its viewers, regardless of age: Sometimes, it is not bad to feel sadness at all. Sadness helps us to dismiss pride and reach out for help. Sadness enables us to empathize and console a friend. Sadness is what makes us truly appreciate the Joy that comes afterwards.”

In today’s society, Inside Out has provided an important moral lesson to its viewers, regardless of age: Sometimes, it is not bad to feel sadness at all. Sadness helps us to dismiss pride and reach out for help. Sadness enables us to empathize and console a friend. Sadness is what makes us truly appreciate the Joy that comes afterwards.

Inside Out:

Inside Out is a “major emotion picture” brought to us by Disney and Pixar. This animation film is directed by Pete Docter and collaborated with Ronnie del Carmen (a Filipino Pride from Cavite) in directing and writing its story. The story revolves around the young girl named Riley Andersen (Kaitlyn Dias) and her five humanized emotions: Joy (Amy Poehler), Sadness (Phyllis Smith), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), and Disgust (Mindy Kaling). Through out the film, her emotions are teaming up to guide Riley on her struggle in moving from her hometown, Minnesota, to San Francisco with her parents (Diane Lane and Kyle MacLachlan).

Pros:

  • Lava, the short film that comes before the actual movie, receives a special mention. The scenery is spectacularly made and accompanied by a simple yet sweet acoustic song with the same title. Though, the melody is an iteration from a familiar song (listen to the background music of this inspiring video), still it doesn’t fail to emotionally connect to its viewers and got everyone LSS.   
  • For the movie proper, Inside Out is able to represent the manifestations and impact of emotions to our being effectively with all allegories written in the story — including how the film translates personality, memories and thinking process to different fascinating visualizations that serve as plot devices to drive the story forward.
  • The film has social relevance because it recognizes the importance of each emotions as well as its drawbacks (Joy is not even an exception). It also encourages people, especially the children, to open up and express themselves to reach out to people around them. Thus, it’s a must watch for family, parents and kids!
  • Character lines are witty yet informative and helpful in personifying emotions. Here’s one good example for me: Sadness: Wait, Joy, you could get lost in there! Joy: Think positive! Sadness: Okay. I’m positive you will get lost in there!
  • In today’s society, Inside Out has provided a moral lesson to its viewers, regardless of age: Sometimes, it is not bad to feel sadness at all. Sadness helps us to dismiss pride and reach out for help. Sadness enables us to empathize and console a friend. Sadness is what makes us truly appreciate the Joy that comes afterwards.

Cons:

  • The movie spends about 2/3 of its screen time in exposition. But given the nature of the story, it is unavoidable. I think the movie becomes more enjoyable when viewed the second time around.
  • I find it a little bit distracting when the movie shifts between Riley’s world and Riley’s mind world. But then again the story demands it and I see that creators did the most efficient and effective way to tell the story in that mechanism.
  • The music scores of Michael Giacchino are quite underwhelming compared to his compositions in Pixar’s film Up! where he collaborated with Pete Docter too. In my opinion, his music does not pushes through especially in the scenes that demand it the most.

Inside Out (2015) is now showing since August 19 here in the Philippines and has already grossed P97.17 millions locally in a span of 5 days.

 

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